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The Charlton Breen Refugee Assistance Program PDF Print E-mail

In memory of Chuck Breen, for his dedication and tireless efforts for the people of Sudan, MDC has established the "Charlton Breen Refugee Assistance Program Fund (RAPF)."  20% of the general contributions that MDC receives, as well as 100% of the contributions ear-marked for RAP, will be directed to this new fund.

In August of 2009, the Michigan Darfur Coalition launched RAP to assist refugees from Sudan who are living in Michigan.  Our goal is to help them become self-reliant. Assistance is provided on the basis of the refugee's long term goals and our determination of how we can best help.  Depending of the specific needs of the refugee, we may supplement assistance already available or provide assistance when no other alternatives are available.  In addition to the five Darfuris currently living in Grand Rapids, a family of seven Darfur refugees arrived on March 24.  Click here to see how you can help!

One example of the work RAP provides is tuition assistance.  After working with the Department of Education, and the school’s financial aid department to secure financial assistance, MDC may be able to provide additional financial aid for attending college, if a need remains.  We have also provided funding for bus passes to get to and from work, GED classes, and driver training fees. 

To ensure that this program is successful, we need funding.  Please consider making a financial contribution to the Michigan Darfur Coalition today.  You can make a secure donation from our web-site, using Pay-Pal.   The MDC is a recognized non-profit charitable organization, so your contribution is tax-deductible.

Also, consider holding a fundraiser for our Refugee Assistance Program at your:

  • school
  • place of worship
  • scout troop
  • service organization

In some cases, we may be able to provide a guest speaker for your fundraiser or educational materials.   If you need help in organizing an event or if you have any questions about our program, please send your inquiry to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

For more information about some of the refugees currently in Michigan, please read the article below from The Grand Rapids Press.

 
Southern Sudan Healthcare Organization PDF Print E-mail

Southern Sudan Health Care Organization is an organization created to provide relief and support to the people of Southern Sudan. Started by Jacob Atem, one of the Lost Boys of Sudan, his vision is to raise funds to build a medical clinic to serve the needy in Southern Sudan.

SSHCO is a non-profit organization co-founded by Jacob Atem and Lual Awan on March 27, 2008. Jacob and Lual are two of the Lost Boys of Sudan who came to America in 2001. Jacob is a graduate from Spring Arbor University and is currently enrolled in the Masters of Public Health degree program at Michigan State University. Lual is a senior economics student with specialization in international development at Michigan State University. Together, they drive the vision and message of a safer Southern Sudan through healthcare and education.

To learn more about Jacob and Lual's organization, Please visit their website!

 

 
Darfur Peace & Development Project PDF Print E-mail

 Darfur Peace & Development Organization (DPDO) was founded in 2002 by a group of Darfurians in the United States. DPDO is a 501 (c)(3) non-profit, non-governmental organization dedicated to a peaceful Darfur that is justly governed and developed in a sustainable manner.  

In addition to the Darfur Schools Program and Solar Cooker Project, DPDO is focused on bringing clean water to the villages of Darfur.  DPDO has the staff in Darfur that can make this happen.  Unlike foreign humanitarian aid who have been expelled from the country, DPDO is there and can continue to do their work with our help.

Filtering water is important to prevent germs from being spread to the children.  A goal of DPDO is to introduce khasans (water storage barrels) that can be filled at the well, and a faucet in the front where the kids can fill up their bottles. Khasans like this help keep the children's hands out of the water they drink.  Each school needs a new khasan, but ideally each should have several so that the students don't have to wait in line to get water and the school staff wouldn't have to make as many trips to the well each day.

Khasans can be purchased directly by DPDO, avoiding the high costs of purchasing containers in the US and shipping them to Sudan.  The Elarify Plastic Company in Karthoum charges:

500 liters horizontal- $160

500 liters vertical- $250

1000 liters horizontal- $325

1000 liters vertical- $375

 To make water to safe to drink, it must be filtered and sanitized for impurities --  an additional, but necessary cost to avert diseases like maleria. 

For more information visit their website: www.darfurpeace.org

Boys bring water up from the well

 

 

A girl bringing water to school on a donkey

 

 

A group of girls gathered around a khasan (water barrell)

 
Kids Against Hunger PDF Print E-mail

Monday, January 17
1:00 - 6:30 p.m.
$5 per person / $15 per family
Groves High School Cafeteria
20500 W. 13 Mile Rd., Beverly Hills, MI 48025

Every day over 40,000 children die from hunger-related diseases. Join us to package 50,000 meals to be sent to Kenya and the Capuchin Soup Kitchen. The issue of hunger is a solvable problem. Bring canned food to be donated to City Mission.

To register & for workshop information go to: www.kidsagainsthunger.org.

Questions? Contact Kimber Bishop-Yanke 248.840.9858 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 
A Voice From Darfur: Abubakar Abdulrasool PDF Print E-mail

Saturday, October 9th, 2 - 4pm
Capitol Area District Library
401 S. Capitol Ave., Lansing, MI 48901

Special Guest Speaker, Abubakar Abdulrasool. Abubakar is a “New American” from Darfur, Sudan.  Abubakar will be sharing his experiences as a refugee, the story of his flight out of Darfur and how volunteers and mentors have contributed to making his resettlement a success.  

 
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